Helens, which erupted 30 years ago: They throw out an age they get if it doesn't line up with their geologic column, or more simply put, they throw out a date they get if it doesn't line up with how old they already think it is!

what is k ar dating used for-33

newnan dating service - What is k ar dating used for

In this article, we will be going over potassium-argon dating (K-Ar) to explain the flaws, assumptions, and cherry-picking in dating methods that are said to be used in dating billions of years, and according to most evolutionists, "proof" of an old-earth.

Potassium decays into argon gas with a half-life of 1.251 billion years (we will round it up to 1.3 to keep things simple).

That means, in 1.3 billion years, half of a potassium sample with decay to argon gas.

Then, in ANOTHER 1.3 billion years (2.6 total), the remaining half will decay.

Then, in ANOTHER 1.3 billion years (3.9 total), the remaining 1/4 will decay, and so on.

This process is used by evolutionists to claim dates to the earth going back 4.6 billion years. Bring decay rates into a court of law to be put under real scrutiny, and a good case could be made against them, but I don't think that's necessary to show the major problems evolutionists already have with what they are claiming, so in this instance, I won't be arguing what they claim as a current decay rate for K-Ar.

Evolutionists today see a half-life decay rate of potassium to argon at 1.3 billion years.

How do they know the decay rate has been the same for millions or billions of years? A portion of this sample was crushed, sieved, and processed into a whole rock powder as well as four mineral concentrates. " Design Science Association, retrieved Dec 19, 2012, [ See also Hans-Joachim Zillmer, Volcanic (igneous) rock, according to evolutionists, is the best way to date ages with K-Ar dating because, theoretically, when a volcano erupts, all the argon gas is released from the rock, and resets the clock back to zero.

To put it bluntly, the evolutionists have no clue, but "In June of 1992, Dr. -Keith Swenson, author who went on the expedition to gather igneous rock with Dr. This all sounds good in theory, but in practice, like with the rock in Mount St.

Helens, which erupted in 1980, strange numbers come back.

The following are the lab results from samples taken at Mount St.